Monday, December 24, 2007

Siva Nathan

"The big thing is that country-specific accounting rules are going to go away. There will be one set of accounting rules for the whole world... within probably 5-7 years. "

Siva Nathan, Associate Professor, School of Accountancy, Robinson College of Business, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA

December 26, 2007, over lunch

Read between the lines on analyst-speak



Convergence of accounting standards entails significant costs

December 27, 2008, 4 pm

Siva Nathan



5 comments:

Murali said...

About Siva...

Education:
Ph.D., 1988, State University of New York at Buffalo
M.B.A., 1982, University of Rochester
B.Com., 1980, University of Bombay

Work Experience:
Manager, Patient Support Services, Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, NY, Sept. 1981 - August 1983.
Assistant Professor, Department of Accounting, Michigan State University, Sept. 1987 - Aug. 1993.
Assistant Professor, School of Accountancy, Georgia State University, September 1993-July 1999.
Associate Professor, School of Accountancy, Georgia State University, August 1999-present.

Interests:
Accounting numbers and the stock market
Financial analysts’ research reports
Financial accounting

Professor Nathan’s teaching interest focuses on financial accounting. His research interests include studying the effects of accounting numbers on stock prices, and financial analysts’ earnings forecasts and investment recommendations. He has published numerous articles in publications such as The Accounting Review , Journal of Accounting Research and Contemporary Accounting Research. Professor Nathan is a recipient of the American Accounting Association Competitive Manuscript Award, and the Journal of Investing Outstanding Paper Award. He has also received the School of Accountancy Junior Faculty Teaching Award. Professor Nathan has appeared on CNBC TV and has been widely cited in the business press in news stories pertaining to sell-side financial analysts and financial accounting controversies.

Source: www2.gsu.edu/~wwwacc/Faculty/snathan/bio.htm

Murali said...

About his work...

Publications: Refereed Scholarly
Swaminathan, S., "The Impact of SEC Mandated Segment Data on Price Variability and Divergence of Beliefs," The Accounting Review (January 1991): 23-41.
[This paper received the 1989 American Accounting Association Competitive Manuscript Award]

Swaminathan, S. and J.Weintrop, "The Information Content of Earnings, Revenues and Expenses," Journal of Accounting Research (Autumn 1991): 418-427.

Dugar, A. and S. Nathan, "The Effect of Investment Banking Relationships on Financial Analysts’ Earnings Forecasts and Investment Recommendations," Contemporary Accounting Research (Fall 1995): 131-160.
[This paper is currently one of the most highly cited papers in the accounting literature]

Nathan, S., "A Test of the Differential Information Hypothesis Explaining the Small Firm Effect." Journal of Applied Business Research (Winter 1996): 115-120.

Tompkins, J., S.Nathan, R.Hermanson and D.Hermanson, "Coauthoring in Refereed Journals: Perceptions of Finance Faculty and Department Chairs." Financial Practice and Education (Fall/Winter 1997): 47-57.

Nathan, S. and K.Dunn, "Business Press Articles and Higher-Level Learning Skills in Accounting Courses." Education + Training (Vol.39, No.5, 1997): 189-194.

Dillon, R. and S.Nathan, "Accounting for Lifetime Memberships: The Case of Travel Time Partners, Inc." Journal of Accounting Education (Fall 1997): 577-590.

Nathan, S., D.Hermanson and R.Hermanson, "Co-Authoring in Refereed Journals: Views of Accounting Faculty and Department Chairs." Issues in Accounting Education (February 1998): 79-92.

Publications: Refereed Professional /Practitioner
Dugar, A. and S.Nathan, "Financial Analysts’ Research Reports: Caveat Emptor," Journal of Investing (Winter 1996): 13-22.
[This paper received the Journal of Investing Award for Outstanding Papers]

Publications: Books and Monographs
Annotated bibliography in The Modern Theory of Financial Accounting, edited by Lawrence D. Brown. Business Publications, Inc., Plano, Texas, 1987.

Abstracts Published:
"The Impact of SEC Mandated Segment Data on Price Variability and Divergence of Beliefs," in Collected Abstracts of the American Accounting Association's 1989 Annual Meeting.

"The Information Content of Earnings, Revenues and Expenses," in Abstracts of the 1991 AAA Northeast Regional Meeting.

"The Relationships Among Information Precision, Investor Beliefs and Security Prices," in Collected Abstracts of the American Accounting Association's 1992 Annual Meeting.

"The Effect of Investment Banking Relationships on Financial Analysts’ Earnings Forecasts and Investment Recommendations," in Collected Abstracts of the American Accounting Association's 1993 Annual Meeting.


www2.gsu.edu/~wwwacc/Faculty/snathan/publishedpapers.htm

Murali said...

Happy that you could make it to The Hindu today. Thought I'd put together the points we discussed... for possible e-mail interviews.

1) The top ten traps that financial analysts can fall into and the countermeasures:
Questions
a) You have done significant research about the US financial analysts. What were the important findings that your work yielded? Has much changed since then?
b) Why is it necessary to look at the topic, in the Indian context?
c) Top ten (or say, eight) traps... (financial analyst model transported from the US into India - bias - compensation - conflicts of interest - private info - regulations such as on FD.)
d) What are the implications - for investors and regultors?
e) Any other points of interest.

2) Convergence of accounting standards:
Questions
a) What is convergence? Do we have similar convergence in other fields?
b) We hear much about convergence these days. Have there been earlier efforts at convergence? What are the major hitches that convergence has had to face?
c) Advantages of convergence.
d) Disadvantages of convergence
e) What are the stages/phases of convergence? Is there any timeline?
f) If convergence has to happen in accounting standards, what are the prerequisites? (auditing, regulatory interpretation)
g) Costs of convergence.

3) Financial analysis
Questions
a) First, a simple definition of financial analysis.
b) What are the inputs to, and the outputs of, financial analysis? How much of financial analysis can be automated? And what is it that a human analyst has to still do?
c) Is there a taxonomy of the tools of financial analysis?
d) What are the hottest tools and methods of financial analysis? Have some earlier tools fallen by the way side in recent times?
e) With increasing transparency in reporting and uniformity in standards, do you think that financial analysis will still have a role to play?
f) What are the most important qualities that a successful financial analyst should have?
g) Any other points of interest.

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Rgs